Lesson Comments

Lesson Comments

Legato X

Syn’s Tips
Head to the Comments section below to discuss and share videos of yourselves applying this to different Scales and Chord Progressions. I look forward to seeing what you come up with!
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João Jófili
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João Jófili Syn never ever failed to surprise me. This seems so impossible! Hope that as I practice, I'll get somewhat close to this beast!
Christian Mayfield
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Christian Mayfield Sounds and looks a lot like the solo from Scream to me. I've wanted to be able to pull off that solo since it came out.
Dominick Bosson
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Dominick Bosson Yeah, probably the solo I have had the hardest time learning. Well, aside from the "Higher" solo.
Mitchell Houghtaling
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Mitchell Houghtaling The Scream solo is 100% alternate picking I believe.
Blake Morgan
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Blake Morgan So how do you practice legato runs like on the stage where you meet with zv and in afterlife with all the sliding everywhere? I have lots of problems with that sort of stuff and trying to find my spot on where I’m trying to slide to. The legato itself as long as there’s not a lot of sliding around I can get with practice but adding those kinds of slides with it just completely throw me off.
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CAGED System Pentatonic Exercise – Lesson 33

Syn’s Tips
It’s important to practice to a Metronome as I’ve illustrated before in previous lesson tips, to develop a good sense of time and feel.

Remember to skip positions as well , they don’t always have to be played in consecutive order. The exercise in this lesson is the best way to start off getting to know the positions, but you can always get creative and think outside the box after you’ve familiarized yourself with the lesson material!

Share with the class and upload videos of yourself dominating this stuff in the "Lesson Comments" section below!

If you like what you see, go visit their profile pages and show em some love!
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Dominick Bosson
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Dominick Bosson Hey, Syn! I was just wondering if there will be song lessons added into the school at any point? What I mean by song lessons is teaching your students songs by Avenged Sevenfold, or even songs of your own choice. Let me know what you think when you have the time. Thanks! 🙂
Ram Kumar
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Ram Kumar This lesson is challenging! It took a while for me to understand what was happening. Once I figured that, I started practicing at a comfortable bpm and it got easier.
Clip Bone
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Clip Bone There is a small mistake showed in the tab, 5th measure(F major pentatonic scale) on the D string it should've been 5th and 3rd fret, not 5th and 2nd. Anyway, this is a very good way to practice, applying the theories and shapes, keep it going guys!
Louis Kahl
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Louis Kahl I was confused about that too but wasn't shure. Thanks now I am 🙂

Overview of the Minor 6 Arpeggio – Lesson 109

Syn’s Tips
This is currently my FAVORITE Arpeggio in the world because of the many Substitution possibilities!

Lets start by breaking down the different chords that can be found in a Minor 6 Arpeggio.

First let's start at the root or Tonic and since Papa Gates demonstrates this in the key of "A", let's stick with that. So we have an "A Minor 6 Arpeggio". By now we should know that this strongly identifies as THE Classic Dorian Sound so obviously we can apply this to Blues and Jazz tunes where you come across that type of Minor Chord. For Jazz, usually the ii chord in a ii V I(remember, lower case denotes minor and upper case, major). In Blues, you can play the Minor 6 arpeggio at any time to give it a bluesier minor sound even over Dominant Chords.

Now let's look at the chord built on the second degree of the "A Minor 6" arp which is "C". This chord has a Lydian 6 sound with it's #4th and natural 6. This means that you could play an "A Minor 6" arp over any "C" major chord if that's the type of Major sound you wish to create. Obviously it would work best over a Lydian based chord or a major chord built off of the 4th degree of an Ionian scale. In this case, we would be in "G" Ionian if we wanted to play an "A Minor 6" arp over a "C" major chord but you could also play an "E Minor 6" arp over "G" Ionian as long as you resolve back to Ionian tastefully. Of course these are basic rules to start with and you may want to abandon them altogether based on what you want to hear personally but the rules are a great jumping off point to gain an aural familiarity.

Now for our next Substitution we are going to have to imagine that there is a "D" in an "A Minor 6" arpeggio to build a chord off of even though there isn't and we wouldn't play it anyway. WHAT?!!! Well I've said it a few times by now but I'll say it again, a lot of times it's not necessary to play the 1st or the 3rd of a chord because they are often implied. Well this is an example of that. If you take the notes of an "A Minor 6" chord with an imagined root note of "D", you have a D9 minus the root. I use this all the time for Dominant chords that I don't want to have an "Altered" sound. You can also use this over The Blues. I love to switch up Chord Qualities to get more mileage out of my chords. What I mean by that is that you can play an "A Dominant(E Minor 6)" AND an "A Minor 6" sound over "A" Blues and they both sound great! You can use this philosophy anywhere as long as it's done tastefully. Papa Gates refers to this so poignantly as, Creating Your Own Weather.

If you do however wish for an "Altered" sound because it may be a V chord resolving back to I, you can play the Minor 6 Arpeggio one half step above your V chord. That's because this is also a Dominant 9 arpeggio a Tritone away from your V chord. I discuss the Tritone Substitution in my "tips" section for the Melodic Minor Modes 2, 3 & 4 Lesson.

Our next Substitution is one that I never use but you may find a use for it. Ironically, the reason it doesn't work for me is that it's missing the 3rd and even though I've told you on multiple occasions that the root and 3rd can often be negated and still work, this is not one of those occasions for me. That's why it's best to experiment with everything to find what works best for you. So anyways, if you build a chord off of "E" using the notes of an "A Minor 6", you get an "E Aeolian 11" sound or "E min b6/11" without the 3rd. Now honestly, I rarely come across this chord and I'm not 100% positive that it's spelled right because theres a 9th in there as well. Some choose to spell out the 9th while others say that an 11th or 13th chord implies that there is a 9th in the chord therefore, you don't need spell it out. Confusing? Well your not alone, I've gone completely crosseyed. So I guess you could play this over a simple Minor Chord as well that you wish to superimpose an Extended Aeolian sound over. Anyways, I'd really love to see what you guys come up with for this in the "comments" section below!

Last but certainly not least, I give you the Minor 7 b5 arpeggio located on the final degree of the Minor 6 Arpeggio. Now aside from using this over a ii chord in a ii V i progression, I love this sound over The Blues! It really gives my Blues playing a very futuristic and quirky kind of sound. I've never heard anyone use this application quite as obscenely as I do, but maybe you have and would like to share with the rest of us.

So now for your Blues in "A", you can play "A Minor 6", "E Minor 6", and "C Minor 6". They all sound great and completely different from each other.

This is A LOT of information so please take some serious time with this. I have spent years on each one of the above Substitutions and continue to experiment and find unique applications because in all actuality, this is just scratching the surface of the Minor 6 Chord.

Please Share With The Class! I am really excited to see what you have in store for this one so please head to the "Lesson Comments" section below and upload videos of yourself demonstrating the material, asking questions, or sharing other artists with us that use these concepts creatively. I will be there hanging out with all of you so don't be shy let's learn from each other!
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Elton Douglas
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Elton Douglas Thanks Papa Gates, someday I'll play just like you and syn! I hope

Pentatonic Picking Exercise – (Hammer-ons & Pull-offs) – Lesson 22

Syn’s Tips
Like Papa Gates says, play it as slow as you can play it perfectly!

Start taking these patterns you'll start learning and create licks out of them. Practice these licks to the backing tracks provided in the lesson content menu.

If you have any questions, ask them in the "Lesson Comments" section below where we can all help you!
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Kross Alex
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Kross Alex Is there any unknown secret for a pull-off?Because if i pull too little,the sound made is very dim,if i pull too much,i hit other strings and it makes a lot of noise, your technique on lower strings seems so smooth i don't even know how to begin...
Ids Schiere
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Ids Schiere In general what you want to try and do with pull offs legato tapping and all that stuff where you dont really pick is trying to press the string perpendicular to the fretboard in this way you will have less unwanted string noise. There are also other ways to cancel the noise but i think this is the easiest one for now.
Marwan Nour
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Marwan Nour I am a beginner and I don't know if this will work for you but I try to avoid hitting other strings by trying to do the pull-offs slowly first and using my thumb on the back to stabilize the fingers hitting the notes. Hope this helps. If anyone has any other suggestions please let us know.
Jackson Harsin
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Jackson Harsin For everyone who may be a new player here, take the advice of playing slow and using a metronome to heart, I promise it may feel like a drag but you will improve exponentially. I've been playing guitar for about 7 1/2 years now and for my first five years I practiced without a metronome and I was decent enough, but as soon as I finally took that advice I have been able to really hammer down and perfect my technique and I have improved twice as fast in the last 2 years as opposed to my first 5.
Jak Angelescu
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Jak Angelescu I have been playing guitar for a long time and I have always worked my legato technique and got "pretty good" with it. But it wasn't until I watched this video that I realized that when I slow down, I get a excess string noise with the pull-offs! I spent literally an HOUR last night on this simple scale alone feeling out what was going on to get it better and it has cleaned up my playing so much.
Brian Haner Sr.
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Brian Haner Sr. That's awesome. Jak! Yeah. The more we preach about slowing down, the more everyone kinds goes - yeah, whatever. I don't really believe in "secrets" to playing guitar. But if I was going to make a top 5 list as to why some players are great and some are not - this would go at the top of the list. It's the reason people practice marshal arts very slowly. You can cheat when you move fast. When you move slowly, you see every nuance and identify any unwanted movements or "blind spots". It's based on the Weber-Fechner rule of sensitivity. Fascinating stuff! So glad you are taking it to heart. It will make you a much better player.
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