Level: Intermediate

Arpeggios in a Single Position – Lesson 50

About This Lesson
Level: Intermediate

Arpeggios in a Single Position – Lesson 50

In this lesson we teach you how to play arpeggios from a single chord family in one position.

Syn’s Tips
This concept is great for you to begin to understand how powerful a single scale can be. There is so much music to be found by building chords off of the different degrees of a scale and this is just the start.

Papa Gates begins with “triads” which simply speaking are, three notes built on 3rds like major or minor chords. There are four types of triads- major, minor, diminished, and augmented. In most cases, you will double up on a couple or all of these notes in your “open” and “CAGED” chords, but when only the three are played together, they are called “triadic” chords.

Triadic chords are great for arpeggiating or strumming as accompaniment to a full band where a “less is more” situation is needed.

You Need to Memorize The Sound of All Four Triads! This is imperative in ear training as you will discover that ALL music contains or “implies” at least one or two of these triad types. Simple power chords that only contain the root and the 5th degrees still imply major or minor depending on the musical or “harmonic” context.

More complicated music will even blend these different triads together for very unique and interesting sounds or “harmony”. A simple example of this is a Major 7th chord. The root, the 3rd, and the 5th notes comprise a major triad but if you take the 3rd, the 5th, and the 7th notes, those create a minor triad because the 5th is a minor third above the 3rd, and the 7th is a fifth above the 3rd. If this is confusing don’t worry, you don’t need to know this now and you can always ask for help if this interests you. It’s also ok if this stuff doesn’t interest you, some people just wanna pick up the guitar and play and there’s absolutely nothing wrong with that! That’s actually kinda why we are all here ;)

You should experiment with these triads by changing the sequence of triads or chord progressions and then share your creations with the class by uploading a video to the "Lesson Comments" section below.

Also, if your watching a video of someone and you like what you see, go check out their profile page and hit em up. You should also recommend them to other people who need help. Introduce yourselves and don’t be afraid to ask for tips. I still do all the time and I truly can’t wait to learn from All Of You!
Lesson Comments
Diego Martínez
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Diego Martínez There´s a mistake at 1:45, in the tab it´s not a 2 (a) in the g string, is a 4 (b).
Brian Haner Sr.
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Brian Haner Sr. Nice catch. Thank you!
David Hernández
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David Hernández I am Diego Martínez friend
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