CAGED System – Changing Pentatonic Scales – Two Chords – D & C – Lesson 29

About CAGED System – Changing Pentatonic Scales – Two Chords – D & C – Lesson 29

Level: Beginner

CAGED System – Changing Pentatonic Scales – Two Chords – D & C – Lesson 29

In this lesson we show you how to change between two different pentatonic scales over their correlating chords.

Syn’s Tips

So as much effort as we have been putting into shifting positions, we want to put into staying in the SAME position when chords and scales change. This will allow to never feel stuck in one position which happens to guitar players a lot because we naturally think in positions and usually have a favorite one thats easiest to play in.

Like any bad habit, it's best to identify them and work on breaking them as early in your development as possible or else they become second nature and engrained in your muscle memory. When that happens, bad habits are a million times harder to break and most guitar player like myself included, may choose to just "deal with it" than spend the months it takes to RE-learn something. I still have bad habits that I just "can't seem to find the time" to break and it truly makes certain aspects of my playing much more difficult than it needs to be and trust me.... I notice it!

Lesson Comments

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Andrew Chung
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Andrew Chung Does anybody have any tips for improvising, other than just keep playing? I've always studied in the modern classical tradition, i.e., learning and playing only by reading sheet music and never by ear. The most I ever got was some time here and there in my high school string orchestra because the director was also the jazz band director and he would have us occasionally improvise in class. We all disliked the infrequent improvising days because it was so foreign. Now, I find myself solely shakily moving up and down scales and thus struggling to come up anything interesting. Thoughts?
Andrew Chung
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Andrew Chung You're right -- not the answer I'd hoped for, but if that's the answer, so be it. Go figure. Thanks.
Jackson Harsin
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Jackson Harsin This is totally not what you want to hear, but the solution... KEEP PLAYING. This is because the more you improvise, the more sounds you learn to chain together within the scales and positions and both your muscles and your mind will learn those chains and you will be mixing and matching chains you've already saved to the brain eventually.
Erin Zibtseva
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Erin Zibtseva This thing works with any two chords and pentatonic scales, doesn't it? Or there's some kind of system there and I understood everything wrong?
Alexander Sanchez
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Alexander Sanchez Wow! A definite eye opening lesson. Thank you so much! By the way, was the background track only major chords?
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