CAGED System – Changing Pentatonic Scales – Two Chords – D & C – Lesson 29

About CAGED System – Changing Pentatonic Scales – Two Chords – D & C – Lesson 29

Level: Beginner

CAGED System – Changing Pentatonic Scales – Two Chords – D & C – Lesson 29

In this lesson we show you how to change between two different pentatonic scales over their correlating chords.

Syn’s Tips

So as much effort as we have been putting into shifting positions, we want to put into staying in the SAME position when chords and scales change. This will allow to never feel stuck in one position which happens to guitar players a lot because we naturally think in positions and usually have a favorite one thats easiest to play in.

Like any bad habit, it's best to identify them and work on breaking them as early in your development as possible or else they become second nature and engrained in your muscle memory. When that happens, bad habits are a million times harder to break and most guitar player like myself included, may choose to just "deal with it" than spend the months it takes to RE-learn something. I still have bad habits that I just "can't seem to find the time" to break and it truly makes certain aspects of my playing much more difficult than it needs to be and trust me.... I notice it!

Lesson Comments

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João Jófili
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João Jófili THANK YOU SO MUCH!!!!
John Setzler
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John Setzler I guess for some reason I've always thought that (thinking can hurt, right?), and I knew ABOUT pentatonic scales just never knew them, whatever the key the song is in is that key's pentatonic scale that guitarists would use for solos. But now I'm seeing him play in both the D and C pentatonic scales in the same song. This is where I'm confused and if someone could clear things up, that would be great.
Thomas Lovell
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Thomas Lovell Im confused as to why the pentatonic scale runs don't start on a root note. For example; in this exercise you started the scale on the A? I get the positions of the pentatonic scales but in this example the scale sounds like it wants to resolve on B not D.
Thomas Lovell
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Thomas Lovell Thank you for clarifying. Cheers
Brian Haner Sr.
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Brian Haner Sr. A Pentatonic scale can start on any note in the scale. I used this pattern because it's the one most guitarists are familiar with. And you're right - it can resolve to B, which is the relative minor of D. So it's a D major pentatonic AND a B minor pentatonic. If you're playing rock or blues - you will end up using the minor pentatonic a lot more than the major. Sorry for the confusion.
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