Introduction To Simple Chords – Em & G – Lesson 12

About Introduction To Simple Chords – Em & G – Lesson 12

Level: Beginner

Introduction To Simple Chords – Em & G – Lesson 12

In this lesson, we introduce you to your first chords – Em & G, and show you some simple strumming patterns.

Syn’s Tips

Always play to the backing tracks when you can and practice applying some of the strumming patterns you learned from the previous lesson to these chords. Always experiment with different patterns or rhythms you hear in different songs and try creating some yourself to explore your own creativity. All of these lessons should be jumping off points. I can't stress the importance of changing or manipulating everything taught to you enough. This is how you begin to create those epic masterpieces you are all capable of! I call this .... Making it Your Own!

Head to the "Lesson Comments" section below and upload videos of yourselves demonstrating the material. We are all there to answer questions for you as well!

Lesson Comments

Please sign up or sign in to interact on this post.
Laura Martinez
Comment hidden. Show this comment
Laura Martinez Hello. I was wondering if someone could help give advice on some methods to prevent shoulders and neck from tensing/tightening while playing. I've noticed that after a minute or two I starts losing the ability to play as smoothly because of the shoulders tensing up involuntarily.
Matthieu Dubois
Comment hidden. Show this comment
Matthieu Dubois Hi Brian, Can you explain how is built the G major chord. I tried to build it with the 1/3/5 method but Ican't figure it out.
Matthieu Dubois
Reply hidden. Show this reply
Matthieu Dubois Thank you Brian, I get it now. In the classic G chord : GBDGBG , I understand the beginning of that chord : G (1st) B(2nd) D (third) G(first), B(second), but I don't understand why it's an G at the end of it. If we follow the 135 tech, it would be a D . Why is it a G?
Brian Haner Sr.
Reply hidden. Show this reply
Brian Haner Sr. In a G scale (GABCDEF#), G is the 1, B is the 3 and D is the 5. So just find those 3 notes and you're done! It can be as simple as 6th string, 1st fret (G) - 5th string, 2nd fret (B) & 4th string open. As long as you have those three notes in your chord - you have built a G major chord. Obviously, the notes can be repeated - and you can put them in any order you want. The classic open G chord I show here is G B D G B G.
Farrukh Jafri
Comment hidden. Show this comment
Farrukh Jafri No backing tracks??
load 5 more comments
Yes No