Overview of The C Chord Family – Lesson 21

About Overview of The C Chord Family – Lesson 21

Level: Beginner

Overview of The C Chord Family – Lesson 21

In this lesson we introduce you to the C Major chord family; C Dm Em F G Am & Bdim.

Syn’s Tips

So as you can see, the Pentatonic scale is pure magic! This one scale works over an entire family of chords and as a beginner and even an advanced player a lot of times, spending as little time possible thinking about a bunch of different scales that work over a chord progression is important to allow for creativity and flow. Nothing will take you outta the game more than overthinking and overworking.

So in my previous lesson tips about chords, I talked about creating riffs, or embellishments, to spice up your chords and strumming. Well now it's time to take this concept and apply it to scales you will begin to learn and make little melodic "motifs" and interesting patterns within them. Instead of being called riffs tho, they are called "licks" as Papa Gates mentioned in the video.

Every great and even decent player has a certain sized bag of tricks that they pull from. When it comes to soloing or lead guitar, we transcribe licks either from our own creation or from other players we want to sound like. It's important however, if you take from other players, to change up their licks a little bit and make them "your own". Good players sound like other players but GREAT players sound like themselves and I promise that even they work diligently on this. Be sure to record these on a phone or recording device because I PROMISE YOU, if you do not take the time to do this, you WILL forget them.

Upload a video of yourself in the "Lesson Comments" section below playing a Lick you've transcribed from someone and then rewrite it a little to make it your own and play that as well!

Lesson Comments

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Christian J.S. Schulze Aguiar
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Christian J.S. Schulze Aguiar First and foremost thant Papa and Syn Gates for this amazing and informative site! On to the questions: If I got it right in order to make a pentatonic scale you just need to take the 6th note of a major scale right? Also when it comes to chord family, how do you know when to use minor or major chords? Like the 2nd note of the C major scale is a D. Why not play a D chord instead of Dm chord?
Christian J.S. Schulze Aguiar
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Christian J.S. Schulze Aguiar There is still a lot I don't get....So much rich information! So if I got it right the sixth note of a major scale makes its minor pentatonic? Like with C major and Am pentatonic. Also when it comes to chord family, how do you know when to use a minor note? For instance, wih
Robin Verkerk
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Robin Verkerk So if I've gotten it right, the A minor pentatonic and C major pentatonic are the exact same scales only with different root notes. And in the previous lesson we learned that to construct a major pentatonic, you remove the 4th and 7th degrees of the corresponding major scale, resulting in C D E G A for the C major pentatonic. What confuses me then, is that the A minor pentatonic isn't A B C E G (removing the 4th and 7th degree from the A minor scale) but rather A C D E G (removing the 2nd and 6th degrees). Are minor pentatonic scales simply constructed differently than major ones?
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