Overview of The C Chord Family – Lesson 21

About Overview of The C Chord Family – Lesson 21

Level: Beginner

Overview of The C Chord Family – Lesson 21

In this lesson we introduce you to the C Major chord family; C Dm Em F G Am & Bdim.

Syn’s Tips

So as you can see, the Pentatonic scale is pure magic! This one scale works over an entire family of chords and as a beginner and even an advanced player a lot of times, spending as little time possible thinking about a bunch of different scales that work over a chord progression is important to allow for creativity and flow. Nothing will take you outta the game more than overthinking and overworking.

So in my previous lesson tips about chords, I talked about creating riffs, or embellishments, to spice up your chords and strumming. Well now it's time to take this concept and apply it to scales you will begin to learn and make little melodic "motifs" and interesting patterns within them. Instead of being called riffs tho, they are called "licks" as Papa Gates mentioned in the video.

Every great and even decent player has a certain sized bag of tricks that they pull from. When it comes to soloing or lead guitar, we transcribe licks either from our own creation or from other players we want to sound like. It's important however, if you take from other players, to change up their licks a little bit and make them "your own". Good players sound like other players but GREAT players sound like themselves and I promise that even they work diligently on this. Be sure to record these on a phone or recording device because I PROMISE YOU, if you do not take the time to do this, you WILL forget them.

Upload a video of yourself in the "Lesson Comments" section below playing a Lick you've transcribed from someone and then rewrite it a little to make it your own and play that as well!

Lesson Comments

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Christian J.S. Schulze Aguiar
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Christian J.S. Schulze Aguiar First and foremost thant Papa and Syn Gates for this amazing and informative site! On to the questions: If I got it right in order to make a pentatonic scale you just need to take the 6th note of a major scale right? Also when it comes to chord family, how do you know when to use minor or major chords? Like the 2nd note of the C major scale is a D. Why not play a D chord instead of Dm chord?
Christian J.S. Schulze Aguiar
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Christian J.S. Schulze Aguiar There is still a lot I don't get....So much rich information! So if I got it right the sixth note of a major scale makes its minor pentatonic? Like with C major and Am pentatonic. Also when it comes to chord family, how do you know when to use a minor note? For instance, wih
Robin Verkerk
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Robin Verkerk So if I've gotten it right, the A minor pentatonic and C major pentatonic are the exact same scales only with different root notes. And in the previous lesson we learned that to construct a major pentatonic, you remove the 4th and 7th degrees of the corresponding major scale, resulting in C D E G A for the C major pentatonic. What confuses me then, is that the A minor pentatonic isn't A B C E G (removing the 4th and 7th degree from the A minor scale) but rather A C D E G (removing the 2nd and 6th degrees). Are minor pentatonic scales simply constructed differently than major ones?
Chris Rios
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Chris Rios In the last lesson, we learned the same scale, A minor pentatonic. The only difference is that the name changed from C to A
Matthieu Dubois
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Matthieu Dubois Hi Brian, I was wondering, how do you know if it's a major or minor chord? What's the rule about that? Matt From France Thank You.
Matthieu Dubois
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Matthieu Dubois Thanks a lot : )
Aria Rivv
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Aria Rivv so, to further clarify, a major chord is composed by the 1st 3rd and 5th notes in its major scale, for example the E chord is composed by E, B and g# while its minor is composed by the 1st, a minor third(wich is half a tone, or a fret, behind the third) and the 5th of its major scale.
Matthieu Dubois
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Matthieu Dubois Thank you.
Raphaela Mettig
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Raphaela Mettig TL;DR by ear: if the chord sounds "happy" - major, "sad" - minor. In theory: the third defines whether it's a major or minor chord
Mike Pollaro
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Mike Pollaro does it matter where you land the solo portion based on what chord its building from?
Ram Kumar
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Ram Kumar This is a very useful lesson! I'm sure this will help me develop my own style of playing.
Wuthawat Chanthila
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Wuthawat Chanthila good lesson how to use scales
Shawn Zimmermann
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Shawn Zimmermann i still don't understand how he's getting these chords could someone explain it to me?
Shawn Zimmermann
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Shawn Zimmermann thanks a lot that helped quite a bit!
Steven Donnelly
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Steven Donnelly Basically, all the chords are built off of the notes in the C major scale. At this stage, that's about as much as you need to know. To add more, without going in too deep, each major scale consists of 3 major, 3 minor, and 1 diminished chord. There's an explanation to why the diminished chord comes about in the video, but basically you'll pick up the theory of what is what and why as you go along. I've only recently started looking at the theory side of music recently and it's not as hard as it first seems. Stick with it. πŸ™‚
John Tierney
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John Tierney Papa Gates, Syn or anyone PLEASE correct me if I'm wrong here. But when I was following the video, I had the C maj scale written out and following it, but I noticed when you said we raised it, that the 1-3-5 pattern was simply moved across the scale. For instance D minor, I moved 1-3-5 so D is 1 and F =3 and A=3 so if I go to the Bdim chord I was kind of thrown for a loop that that was at first glance in the lesson as a minor because in my pattern that I was doing, I had the correct notes at the end where B = 1, D= 3 and F = 5. So is this one way to look at it and that all the other chords (other than C) when you take their respective major scale and follow the rules 1-3-5 = major, 1-3b-5 = minor and 1-3b-5b = Diminish that the notes just so happen to fall in the C major scale? Or did I COMPLETELY screw up
John Tierney
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John Tierney #038;feature=share" rel="nofollow" class="um-link" target="_blank">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SPRYty5Li18&feature=share Hope this helps with confusion Papa Gates and Supraja πŸ™‚
Supraja Vadlamani
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Supraja Vadlamani Hello Papa Gates, here you just said that the relationship between D-F-A is 1-3b-5. I'm confused as to why this is because if the 3rd note of this scale is F (which I'm aware of), wouldn't the Fbase be an E for the 3b? Making the notes D-E-A...? I'm sorry if this is a stupid question!
John Tierney
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John Tierney Sorry new features. But an example is that G Major is G-B-D which is the 1st - 3rd- and 5th notes respectively in the G Major scale. Now if I moved this pattern to the B note in the G Major scale for instance and I use 1-3-5 I have B-D-F# which is a B minor chord. Essentially I saw that if you know the order of chords to any major scale and you use 1-3-5 with 1 = the root, you can find the notes in each chord. If I could put pictures this would be more helpful but I hope I clarified confusion. If not I could maybe put a video of myself explaining this up if that would be better.
John Tierney
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John Tierney Sort of. I was looking at the scale and following a pattern that is a bit unorthodox. I am aware that Major is 1-3-5, minor is 1-3b-5 and diminished is 1-3b-5b also the major scales order is Major-Minor-Minor-Major- Major -Minor - Dim. The thing I noticed is that if I take the G major for instance I took the pattern for the Major chord construction (1-3-5) and I saw that in the G Major scale if I moved across using this pattern that it shows what notes make each triad.
Brian Haner Sr.
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Brian Haner Sr. Not sure what your question is. But when you move through the scale, the pattern stays the same. The relationship of the notes in C-E-G is 1-3-5. When you move them up the scale you get D-F-A and the relationship between those notes would be 1-b3-5. And this applies to all keys. So in the key of say, G - the scale would be: GABCDEF# and the chord family would be: G - Am - Bm - C - D - Em - F#dim. The majors are always 1-3-5, the minors are always 1-b3-5 & the dim is always 1-b3-b5. Did I answer your question?
Regi Teopy
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Regi Teopy Little confused, a diminished chord here is the root, a flat third and a flat fifth? I thought that was a minor chord Need help
John Tierney
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John Tierney A minor chord (not Am, but a minor) is root- flat 3rd and a 5th. Hope this clarifies confusion lemme know how you feel
Vitor Reis
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Vitor Reis That was a really nice way to explain the chord family or as I learned it "the chords of the tone". By only knowing the pattern to find the root, 3rd and 5th, and understanding if it's a major 3rd or minor 3rd we can find all the chords of that tone. Great class.
Umut Tepe
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Umut Tepe my brain starts to burning
Emily Le
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Emily Le Sounds good! It'll be challenging at the start, but when you get the idea, it's incredible!
Jody Guzman
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Jody Guzman I know when I go to record my music in a year. That it will be a masterpiece. I don't say this to be arrogant. It's the faith I have in what I'm learning from u two. I have bad add and I get excited learning new things to the point where I'm already making my own riffs with what I'm learning, and never learn the whole thing only retaining a small portion. It's quite a feat Papa Gates!!!U teach in the most understanding way I have ever seen. I received my first guitar at 14. I'm 44 and Just now learning names of numbers and patterns I know is exciting. U are filling in what I've missed. From all my soul to urs thank u two so much!!! U saved and made possible the completion of my lifes work and for that I am gratefully overwhelmed...
John Tierney
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John Tierney I'm ADD too and I'm constantly boncing from one section to another. Not recording and my school life will monopolize a lot of my time, but I started just screwing with scales on a computer program and I like the sounds. However I didn't know anything about theory or why it is what it is. And that they respond to you actually really helped my confidence (which I struggle with a lot). Essentially that we can be constructive to one another here w/o judgement is the thing I needed to keep going. If it weren't for this community I would just feel like a half assed bedroom guitarist that no one cares about. Good luck with your recording you will do fine 30 years experience you'll be fantastic. Rock on Jody πŸ€˜πŸ‘πŸŽΈπŸ˜
Stathis Tsak
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Stathis Tsak I need to question if these thoughts are mine. Just kidding I understand how we extract these chords from the (C D E F G A B) formula but i dont understand why some of them are minor and some major. Ofcourse we can tell by the shape but whats the theory behind it? (im talking about the chords at 2:00)
John Shepherd
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John Shepherd C major scale is CDEFGABC that means we count them with 1234567(8) a major chord is built from the 1st(root note) the 3rd and the 5th notes a minor chord is built from the first root the 3th note BUT you need to FLAT this note we call that b3 and the 5th note. hope i could help πŸ™‚
Vas Rely
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Vas Rely Haha, you guys forgot to cut off the last part
Joe Ulrich
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Joe Ulrich This is how I'm able to make songs into my own style. I love that you went into detail with this! Really needed to see it