Overview of the Major 7 Arpeggio – Lesson 107

About Overview of the Major 7 Arpeggio – Lesson 107

Level: Advanced

Overview of the Major 7 Arpeggio – Lesson 107

Overview of the Major 7 Arpeggio

In this lesson we cover different positions of the Major 7 arpeggio.

Syn’s Tips

There's a lot of cool applications for all of these Arpeggios. You can basically treat these the same as you would your other CAGED shapes and apply your Double Stops, 6th Harmonies(string skipped double stop), Embellishments and Ornamentation, Licks, Techniques and more.

Now would be a good time to discuss Enclosure with the class.

Enclosure is when you take a note of an Arpeggio, and play the notes before and after it as well as playing the note of the Arpeggio thereby Enclosing or surrounding the target note.

For example, let's take the notes of a C Maj7 Arp, C, E, G, and B as our target notes and write a basic lick with them using Enclosure. You would play, "B, D, C, D, F, E, F, A, G, A, C, B, and back to C".

This is just a basic example but there are a lot of different permutations of this and they can be found a lot in Jazz, especially in the earlier eras.

Django Reinhardt, the Godfather of Gypsy Jazz used this in so much of his playing.

Go to the "Lesson Comments" section below and share with us some your favorite Enclosure and Gypsy Jazz licks!

Lesson Comments

Kyle-James Parsons
Comment hidden. Show this comment
Kyle-James Parsons Hey Papa Gates! Loving these lessons!! I have a question: would you say studying arpeggios (and legato alongside) is a good way to build finger strength, speed and independence over say, “spider” exercise variations, trills, scale runs etc.?
Brian Haner Sr.
Reply hidden. Show this reply
Brian Haner Sr. I've never been a big fan of spider exercises, simply because I don't find them musical. Arpeggios are great for finger strength as well as helping with sweep picking, etc.
Yes No