Overview of the “Modes” – Lesson 59

About Overview of the “Modes” – Lesson 59

Level: Intermediate

Overview of the “Modes” – Lesson 59

In this lesson we explain the “Modes” and how they differ from the seven positions of the Major scale.

Syn’s Tips

What did he just say?!

I know that this is a crazy concept to just tell your mind to think of one thing as two completely different things altogether but it will make sense soon enough I promise!

I am gonna let this sink in so no confusing bonus material from me today! You’re welcome!

Share your questions and comments in the "Lesson Comments" section below.

Lesson Comments

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Oleh Olkhovskiy
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Oleh Olkhovskiy A good lesson, I have long wanted to understand the modes, now I'll play, Thanks!)
Josh Lindblad
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Seth Shumaker
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Seth Shumaker I understand that the functionality of each mode is different, but as far as patterns go, are the 7 patterns of each mode going to be the same as the 7 patterns of the major scale, just with a different root?
Triston Taylor
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Triston Taylor so if you start or accent a note 3 frets above, it creates a different mode? does that mean that modes are about relative position to the root note?
Michael Bauer
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Michael Bauer I do finally get it. I don't think I can explain it very well but from what I got it's basically you are in the Cmaj scale. Write out the entire fret board and the notes in Cmaj. Buy C is no longer your root note. Your new root note is D and the 3rd 5ths 7th ect follow after the D as the 1st and 8th or root.
Jacob Blake
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Jacob Blake So if Im getting this right its all about context. Kinda like chord iversions, its kinda hard to tell what chord it is unless you know the key. So with modes a D dorian sounds like a C ionian unless you establish the tonal center or root?
John Tierney
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John Tierney When I first learned it, remember Ionian = major so already we know one of the 7. So on paper if you write out all the notes in a said key, we write it in major usually and the pattern is WWHWWWH (W = WHOLE step, H = HALF step) this is Ionian. But if we go to the Dorian mode the pattern is WHWWWHW and Phrygian is HWWWHWW and so on. Number wise Ionian being 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 the Dorian mode is 2,3,4,5,6,7,1 So if you tell me a root note say G then you tell me Dorian for example. I would go in my notebook where I have all notes in a key written out, I would find the note G as the second note in the key (degree?) in this examples case it is the key of F major and use THOSE notes starting on G. If I am correct please let me know if I'm wrong PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE let me know before I mess myself up or worse someone else. Also for people who are beginners I actually HIGHLY recommend that you write out the notes on each key from the circle of fifths video. This will help when you look at the fretboard option in the videos to see where they are coming from it helped me a lot. Furthermore, try doing them WITHOUT looking them up, do that when your done 😁. Thank you for reading this long post Rock on and play hard
K Schilli
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K Schilli This is jumping way ahead of my abilities, but if you were going to transcribe a song how would you differentiate between the tonal center being the key of D minor or C dorian?
Jen Hapke
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Jen Hapke If I got it right, I think in the D minor key are different notes than in D dorian. In the minor the scale consits of d,e,f,g,a,bflat and c(like Fmaj (ionian)). The D dorian has the same notes like the Cmaj (ionian) scale. So the flated b is appears in Dminor but not in D dorian.
K Schilli
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K Schilli I meant D dorian which was already addressed above.
John Tierney
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John Tierney So to kind of think of this is that a position tells you where to go. And the mode tells you the fine details is that right or did I miss something?
Alex Olson
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Alex Olson So playing modally is essentially accentuating notes of the underlying chords, correct?
Brian Haner Sr.
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Brian Haner Sr. No. Each mode is separate and must be thought of that way. It's best to think of each mode as having its own scale, chords and properties. Take D Dorian. It is a D minor scale. Period. EVERYTHING about it is minor. It sounds minor and you play minor licks over it. When I'm playing in D Dorian - I am simply thinking of playing in Dm. The confusing part is that it just HAPPENS to share the same notes as a C Major scale - but the LAST thing you should be thinking about when soloing over it is C Major. Make sense?
Teemu Sirviö
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Teemu Sirviö Overall great explanation about the scales. I didn't know what they even were or what I'm doing. Turns out I already knew what they were but wasn't able to find them or use them on purpose. Well, now I do, thanks to this.