Christopher Lonski

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  • in reply to: 10-52 or 11-54? #183079
    Christopher Lonski
    Christopher Lonski
    Participant

    I use the old Zakk Wylde GHS 10-60 for standard and drop D. I think they’re called “heavyweights” now.The extra thick low string is great for tight riffing and keep everything in tune a bit better since it doesnt flop around as much. You might run into some issues with the strings binding at the nut, but that’s easily fixed with a file.

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    in reply to: Who here can play The Wicked End Solo? #183027
    Christopher Lonski
    Christopher Lonski
    Participant

    Im still not fully setup for recording things properly, but just so you dont have to wait, I tabbed out the solo and section just before it on powertab so you can hear what it sounds like. I will do a video, soon, playing the solo and explaining what I think was going through Syn’s mind as he was writing it to open the theory up for you guys a little and hopefully give people some new soloing options and concepts. This solo is chock full of really cool musical concepts like anticipation, chromaticism, and re-harmonization. Harmonically, he uses the Eb quite a bit over the G minor chord (Eb Major 7) which implies phyrgian even though the whole progression is strictly diatonic and in D natural minor, aside from the last chord which is an A7 and uses the C#. It really has kind of a bebop sound to a lot of it.

    Im pretty sure this is either 100% correct or about 98% correct, depending on how you choose to tab something out. You can transcribe things EXACTLY how they are play on the album, but if you have any experience transcribing, you’ll know that once things are slowed down and you hear every little note and sound that is played, everything isn’t totally intended and on purpose. Sometimes you hear little pick scratches or extra notes that dont seem like they were meant to be played. Maybe the player’s technique was “off” a little. Either way, I chose to tab it how I’m pretty sure Syn wrote it and not necessarily every little noise that was recorded. I think you’ll understand once you hear the Powertab.

    Also take notes of the sweeps, they are not exactly the same going up and down each time. He’s playing different notes as they lead into the next chord. So like on the first D minor sweep he plays 13-16-17 or F Ab A, and then plays 13-17-18 on the next, because the next chord is a Bb Major and the notes LEAD into a Bb Major chord so he is playing a strong chord tone on the down beat of the next measure. It’s difficult for me to explain through message, but hopefully I will be able to properly convey it in the video.

    Anyway, here it is. Hopefully this is the end all, be all for the transcription of this modern day legend of a solo. Enjoy guys and girls.

    The Wicked End Solo (Powertab) – https://drive.google.com/open?id=1sRzNtSMbC95mki1mNKbLf9eAwY5FrJBI

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    in reply to: Does bad technique matter if results are good? #182956
    Christopher Lonski
    Christopher Lonski
    Participant

    I think a lot of people are kind of confused about what “good” technique is. The only thing you should be considering when judging technique is “Does it sound good and is the player conveying the idea that they want to convey how they want it?” Lots of rock players in the old days had what many people would consider “bad” technique by today’s standards because we are so used to hearing these virtuosos that have developed over the years and also all the polished studio recording that come out now. Every singer has perfect pitch because of autotune and every musician has perfect technique because you can punch in every note. They sound pleasing to the ear, but I would argue that it’s made much less interesting because those little “mistakes” that used to exist on recordings gave the artists their character. It’s also part of the reason popular music has become less complex over the years, because many of the artists that are pushed on the masses are even really that talented as musicians. They are more pre-packaged and regurgitated products. I would say that this is particularly true of pop country.

    I digress, but to directly answer your question, it doesnt matter how you hold your pick or anything like that. It only matters if you like that way something sounds and are able to play it consistently like that.

Viewing 3 posts - 1 through 3 (of 203 total)
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