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Overview of The Major Chord – Lesson 8

Lesson by: SynGates.com

SynGates.com

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In this lesson, we explain how the Major triad is constructed from a Major scale.
 

Mathmilam

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Feb 12, 2020
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A great band to learn awesome chords progressions and variations from is the Beatles. Their music is littered with 7, maj7, augmented, and many other types of chords. And their songs provide a fun way to learn and practice these chords.
 
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Soukayna

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Apr 2, 2020
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This particular lesson I find a bit confusing, from what I understand he's trying to teach us how to play the C chord, something I had prior knowledge of, the thing ithat I don't get is when he is playing each note by itself i think it's called progression, I just don't understand the reason behind it, that's most likely due to my ignorance of music theory, what I mean is I know that the E chord is 1st fret of the b string, 2nd on the the D and 3rd on the A, what's the purpose behind progression, I'm confused
 
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Conor Mason

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Nov 11, 2019
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This particular lesson I find a bit confusing, from what I understand he's trying to teach us how to play the C chord, something I had prior knowledge of, the thing ithat I don't get is when he is playing each note by itself i think it's called progression, I just don't understand the reason behind it, that's most likely due to my ignorance of music theory, what I mean is I know that the E chord is 1st fret of the b string, 2nd on the the D and 3rd on the A, what's the purpose behind progression, I'm confused

Hi Soukayna. I hope this answers your question. When he is teaching the chord itself, he is showing you the notes that chord is made up of from the C Major scale (for the C major chord). If someone plays the notes individually versus all at once, letting them each ring out; that is called an Arpeggio. Nothing to worry about now, lol.

A chord progression would be a series of chords, usually from a scale to make the overall key of a song. For example, if you played a C-Am-D major-G major series of chords, one after another in any kind of strumming pattern, that would be a Chord progression. The purpose of a progression is to outline the overall sound of a song, whether Major or Minor. So, a simple C-D-G chord progression (which is a really common one BTW) is in the key of C Major since those chords come from the scale itself. Does that make sense? It's getting a little into theory. So, Papa Gates is giving you a little bit of chord knowledge which is the notes of the scale that make the chord and about chord progressions, which is a series of chords played together in a set rhythm.

I hope that makes sense! I know it takes a bit of time to get used to. Feel free to reach out for any help
 

Soukayna

Free Bird Player
Apr 2, 2020
29
33
Morocco
1
Hi Soukayna. I hope this answers your question. When he is teaching the chord itself, he is showing you the notes that chord is made up of from the C Major scale (for the C major chord). If someone plays the notes individually versus all at once, letting them each ring out; that is called an Arpeggio. Nothing to worry about now, lol.

A chord progression would be a series of chords, usually from a scale to make the overall key of a song. For example, if you played a C-Am-D major-G major series of chords, one after another in any kind of strumming pattern, that would be a Chord progression. The purpose of a progression is to outline the overall sound of a song, whether Major or Minor. So, a simple C-D-G chord progression (which is a really common one BTW) is in the key of C Major since those chords come from the scale itself. Does that make sense? It's getting a little into theory. So, Papa Gates is giving you a little bit of chord knowledge which is the notes of the scale that make the chord and about chord progressions, which is a series of chords played together in a set rhythm.

I hope that makes sense! I know it takes a bit of time to get used to. Feel free to reach out for any help
From what I understand a chord is made from a scale so it would make sense to play the C major scale which is played note by note to show where the C major chord came from, is that it ?:unsure: It seems like I'm gonna have to learn music theory after all 😂, I've been avoiding it for two years but I guess whoever survived financial mathematics would make it through music theory..oh I hope I do, anyway thank you so so much 😊
 
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Conor Mason

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Nov 11, 2019
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109
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Hermitage, Pennsylvania- USA
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From what I understand a chord is made from a scale so it would make sense to play the C major scale which is played note by note to show where the C major chord came from, is that it ?:unsure: It seems like I'm gonna have to learn music theory after all 😂, I've been avoiding it for two years but I guess whoever survived financial mathematics would make it through music theory..oh I hope I do, anyway thank you so so much 😊
Hey! yep, you got that right! The Major scale, regardless of key (i.e. C, D, E, F...etc) is the series of notes that create that tonal sound or center. When you take the first( root) note in the scale, then add in other tones from that scale, (root-3rd-5th for example) that creates a sound like the C major chord, which is C-E-G (1-3-5) in basic theory. I don't want to complicate things too much too soon, hahaha. You have a grasp already! Yeah, Music theory is like the really confusing stereo instructions nobody understands. You really can't stand it at first, but you gotta pick up the instructions to figure out how your stereo works! LOL. Honestly, starting with major scale and starting there is enough at first. Music is built entirely off of the Major scale and it's component scales. Having knowledge of this scale and starting there is such a crucial foundation! I was like you...I avoided theory too. I think of it like guidelines or the basics of a recipe. One you have the foundation of the basics, the advanced stuff is really, really easy. You can take that recipe for spaghetti and turn it into any kind of nice dish to your tastes! Theory gives you the map of how to approach music. What really helped me is to play piano too, since most of western music theory is based off of a piano!! makes so much sense versus the guitar! I started with the major scale and then learned the circle of fifths( which teaches you relative minors/majors). that's plenty! then build off of it. It's like learning a technique such as economy picking. Practice the technique, then I instantly find an example in a song I love or that has that technique in it and apply it to a 'real world' scenario, like a song. It helps to apply it like that, to me, so you learn it easier rather than cramming a bunch of stuff in a book that sounds like you are trying to learn ancient Greek! Even I am constantly renewing my theory knowledge and I've been playing all my life!

A great You Tube channel to follow is by Rick Beato. He's a former producer who has done huge bands and is now retired. He is really well versed and is really easy to understand. You are most welcome! Best of luck in your musical journey and Please reach out! I try too scan the forums and get on here everyday, but I work in healthcare, so it's busy with all the craziness in the world now. I hope that helps clear things up!
 

Soukayna

Free Bird Player
Apr 2, 2020
29
33
Morocco
1
Hey! yep, you got that right! The Major scale, regardless of key (i.e. C, D, E, F...etc) is the series of notes that create that tonal sound or center. When you take the first( root) note in the scale, then add in other tones from that scale, (root-3rd-5th for example) that creates a sound like the C major chord, which is C-E-G (1-3-5) in basic theory. I don't want to complicate things too much too soon, hahaha. You have a grasp already! Yeah, Music theory is like the really confusing stereo instructions nobody understands. You really can't stand it at first, but you gotta pick up the instructions to figure out how your stereo works! LOL. Honestly, starting with major scale and starting there is enough at first. Music is built entirely off of the Major scale and it's component scales. Having knowledge of this scale and starting there is such a crucial foundation! I was like you...I avoided theory too. I think of it like guidelines or the basics of a recipe. One you have the foundation of the basics, the advanced stuff is really, really easy. You can take that recipe for spaghetti and turn it into any kind of nice dish to your tastes! Theory gives you the map of how to approach music. What really helped me is to play piano too, since most of western music theory is based off of a piano!! makes so much sense versus the guitar! I started with the major scale and then learned the circle of fifths( which teaches you relative minors/majors). that's plenty! then build off of it. It's like learning a technique such as economy picking. Practice the technique, then I instantly find an example in a song I love or that has that technique in it and apply it to a 'real world' scenario, like a song. It helps to apply it like that, to me, so you learn it easier rather than cramming a bunch of stuff in a book that sounds like you are trying to learn ancient Greek! Even I am constantly renewing my theory knowledge and I've been playing all my life!

A great You Tube channel to follow is by Rick Beato. He's a former producer who has done huge bands and is now retired. He is really well versed and is really easy to understand. You are most welcome! Best of luck in your musical journey and Please reach out! I try too scan the forums and get on here everyday, but I work in healthcare, so it's busy with all the craziness in the world now. I hope that helps clear things up!
Sir, thank you thank you so much for taking the time to explain this in such detail, if I encounter any problems I will reach out, I'm clearly the "why?" kind of student 😅, best of luck to you as well during these scary times, stay safe so I can ask more question 😂 lol, thank you, you're the real MVP 🙌
 

Conor Mason

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Nov 11, 2019
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Sir, thank you thank you so much for taking the time to explain this in such detail, if I encounter any problems I will reach out, I'm clearly the "why?" kind of student 😅, best of luck to you as well during these scary times, stay safe so I can ask more question 😂 lol, thank you, you're the real MVP 🙌

You are most welcome! My pleasure. I'm a teacher as well, so I understand! I'm the same way and always dissect things until they are a pile of dust, haha. have fun with it!
 
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Joao otavio santos

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Dec 15, 2019
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0
Brazil
Sorry if the answer is obvious but. Ok the major chord formula is 135 and from this on he got the last 4 strings, but why is that 2nd string first fret added?
 
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Ids Schiere

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Sorry if the answer is obvious but. Ok the major chord formula is 135 and from this on he got the last 4 strings, but why is that 2nd string first fret added?
In this lesson he's building a C Major chord. If you have take the first, third and fifth note of the C major scale you have the notes C E and G. If you play open chords you can find the C on the 3rd fret of the A string(5th string) and the first fret of the B string(2nd string). The E on open 6th string, open first string(low and high open E string respectively) and the second fret on the D string(4th string. The G on the 3rd fret of low E and high e string and open G string.

The first fret of the 2nd string us then added because it's a C which is the root of the C Major chord. You add it because it's the octave of the 3rd fret on the A string and it makes the chord sound a bit Fuller.
 

Chris Johnston

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    Sorry if the answer is obvious but. Ok the major chord formula is 135 and from this on he got the last 4 strings, but why is that 2nd string first fret added?
    The chord formula is 135 (That's the 1st 3rd and 5th notes of the scale : C,E,G) - What PG plays for the C major chord is : C, E, G, C, E - 1,3,5,1,3 - It's still using the same chord formula/harmony because he hasn't added any new notes, just using 1 3 5. That's why it's still a C major chord :)

    Basically if you managed to play every C, E & G on the guitar at the same time with 10 pairs of hands, you'd still be playing a C Major chord, just a massive 'voicing' of the chord. The information contained in the chord hasn't changed from 1 3 5.

    Hope this helps! :D
     

    Conor Mason

    Garage band Groupie
    Nov 11, 2019
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    hey guys, sorry for a late reply. I've been swamped lately at work. The chord formula is the formula for the basic C major triad (3 notes). We add the 2nd string, first fret since that is a C note. the second string, high B open, is a C note when you fret that string at the first fret. There is no half step interval between B-C and E-F. It's adding notes to make the triad so on a guitar is sounds full and open. Hope that makes sense
     

    Akos Szabo

    Free Bird Player
    Nov 11, 2019
    15
    2
    The chord formula is 135 (That's the 1st 3rd and 5th notes of the scale : C,E,G) - What PG plays for the C major chord is : C, E, G, C, E - 1,3,5,1,3 - It's still using the same chord formula/harmony because he hasn't added any new notes, just using 1 3 5. That's why it's still a C major chord :)

    Basically if you managed to play every C, E & G on the guitar at the same time with 10 pairs of hands, you'd still be playing a C Major chord, just a massive 'voicing' of the chord. The information contained in the chord hasn't changed from 1 3 5.

    Hope this helps! :D
    I can't believe it,I already gave up on music theory,but thanks to you,I know understand why are chords like this.
    I tought yeah,1-3-5,but how do I know what else do I need to add,no one explains this.
     

    Chris Johnston

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    I can't believe it,I already gave up on music theory,but thanks to you,I know understand why are chords like this.
    I tought yeah,1-3-5,but how do I know what else do I need to add,no one explains this.
    I'm really glad I could help Akos! ❤ It is tricky to get your head around and I can totally sympathize with wanting to give up on theory (5-6 years ago at college I was in the same boat haha) but it honestly just enhances your playing and gives your ears an explanation/understand of what you're hearing! So don't give up ever 😂

    A great addition to learning on here is A youtuber called 'Rick Beato'. Grab a notepad & pen and check this out:
     
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    Ids Schiere

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    I just read through Syn's tips and he asked to share some chords and I have some but they are more of the fancier kind(6/9, 6, augmented Six and a couple of inversions). Are you guys ok with me sharing those here too? I don't really want to fry any brains😅
     

    Eric Fil

    New Student
    Nov 11, 2019
    3
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    I love how logical everything is in music. Having a simple understanding of the major scale leads to so many possibilities when you start mixing, matching and combining individual notes into chords.
     
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