Arpeggio or Pentatonic Scales

Lavrov Mihai

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Nov 11, 2019
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Hi guys i am studying the CAGED system and i ask myself what are more used Arpeggios or Pentatonic Scales , what should i learn first because i find it a little difficult and i want to know others oppinion about this. Thank you!!
 
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Firsty Lasty

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Nov 11, 2019
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It's all good. You can't avoid either, because pentatonic licks and melodies are everywhere and every chord you learn to play can also be viewed as an arpeggio shape.

Arpeggios are found within the pentatonic scales. The pentatonic scale is like a minor7 chord with one extra note, or you can think of it as a major triad + the related minor triad + one extra note (same thing).
 

Jak Angelescu

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Hi guys i am studying the CAGED system and i ask myself what are more used Arpeggios or Pentatonic Scales , what should i learn first because i find it a little difficult and i want to know others oppinion about this. Thank you!!
If I were you I'd really practice the arpeggios as much as possible. But really make sure you know your notes in the arpeggio. The reason why is that knowing your arpeggios is essentially you knowing your triads, and that's how ALL OF YOUR CHORDS are built. It'll also help you find your way around the neck a lot more with notes. You can see my last video about how helpful learning triads and arpeggios are for finding your way around the neck.
 
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Jak Angelescu

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It's all good. You can't avoid either, because pentatonic licks and melodies are everywhere and every chord you learn to play can also be viewed as an arpeggio shape.

Arpeggios are found within the pentatonic scales. The pentatonic scale is like a minor7 chord with one extra note, or you can think of it as a major triad + the related minor triad + one extra note (same thing).
I just have to tell you that I thought you were wrong at first because I know a pentatonic scale to have the 1 2 3 5 6 in it, and the minor 7th chord with the added 4th is like this 1 3b 4 5 b7. So I was like "the fuck? I'm so confused!" So I went and asked my teacher and he said you were right and had me play it on the neck. I SAW THE FUCKING CHORD INSIDE THE PENTATONIC PATTERN. Holy shit dude my mind was fucking BLOWN. I learned something today! Thanks man! I'm actually going to make a video about this!
 

chris_is_cool

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So I think, 1 2 3 5 6 would be the formula for the major pentatonic, right? So cutting out the 4th and 7th degree of the major scale. For the minor pentatonic, the notes are the same as in the pentatonic of the parent relative major (A minor pentatonic has the same notes as C major pentatonic, because A minor and C major are relative keys), so for the direct construction of the minor pentatonic (not using the relative major), we need to cut out the 2nd and 6th degree instead. So the formula for the minor pentatonic would be 1 b3 4 5 b7. Hope that made some sense.
 
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