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CAGED System – The C Shape – Lesson 24

Lesson by: SynGates.com

Ale Algara

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Nov 11, 2019
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I always use pentatonic scales to improvise, but my sound always comes out the same. The scales we use in this lesson, can we use them to improvise alongside the pentatonics?
 

Calvin Phillips

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I always use pentatonic scales to improvise, but my sound always comes out the same. The scales we use in this lesson, can we use them to improvise alongside the pentatonics?
They probably sound the same cause you're using the same pattern over every chord. Maybe change up your note selection exactly like you're suggesting. Maybe use the penatonic run for your first chord. Then change it to arpeggios over the 2nd chord or whatever. Anything to change up the note selection. I try to do something different with every song I write. Dont always want to use the same arpeggios and chords or you'll end up having the issue you're talking about. And the listeners notice too.
 
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Ids Schiere

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I always use pentatonic scales to improvise, but my sound always comes out the same. The scales we use in this lesson, can we use them to improvise alongside the pentatonics?
There is a lot you can do with a pentatonic scale. It sounds like you just kinda play it up and down. You can skip notes from the scale, change positions etc. The most important thing is that you are able to create a melody/motif and realize not every backingtrack you play over will ask for the same melody/motif.

As for your question, yes you can.
 
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Qwerty1928

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Jun 6, 2020
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Great lesson!

I like how this connects pentatonic, major & arpeggios concepts. They are usually teached separately, and sometimes you don't realize they are related when you are a newbie.

For example, I realized the major triad shapes simply come from the major Arpeggio. When you got it, it seems obvious ^^'

Thinking of having a deep dive into one CAGED shape per month at first, to avoid confusing them.
 

SynEater

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May 19, 2020
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Great lesson!

I like how this connects pentatonic, major & arpeggios concepts. They are usually teached separately, and sometimes you don't realize they are related when you are a newbie.

For example, I realized the major triad shapes simply come from the major Arpeggio. When you got it, it seems obvious ^^'

Thinking of having a deep dive into one CAGED shape per month at first, to avoid confusing them.
Great lesson!

I like how this connects pentatonic, major & arpeggios concepts. They are usually teached separately, and sometimes you don't realize they are related when you are a newbie.

For example, I realized the major triad shapes simply come from the major Arpeggio. When you got it, it seems obvious ^^'

Thinking of having a deep dive into one CAGED shape per month at first, to avoid confusing them.
Me but can you teach me to using triad and arpeggio pentatonic scale
 

SynEater

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Qwerty 1928 so can you teach me to how to using arpeggio and triad scale and applying the pentatonic scale
 

Qwerty1928

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Jun 6, 2020
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Qwerty 1928 so can you teach me to how to using arpeggio and triad scale and applying the pentatonic scale
I had recently learned about "major triads". They are cluster of 3 notes played on 3 different strings, in order to make a "3 strings" major chord (at least this my own freshmen definition :p)

When I learnt it, it was like "ohoh, more major chords than just open chords & bar chords??? Nice!"

Looking at the lesson, and at the "mini chords" within the arpeggio, I finally got it where the triads come from :)
 

Ids Schiere

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Well the note's my problem. When I playing arpeggio. Or string skipping. He just sucks. my finger. when I get arpeggio
You really have got to show what you're doing because that isn't clear at all.

An arpeggio is all the note of a chord played separately, if you show how you play it now I can help you otherwise it's hard to do that.
 

SynEater

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You really have got to show what you're doing because that isn't clear at all.

An arpeggio is all the note of a chord played separately, if you show how you play it now I can help you otherwise it's hard to do that.
[QU
You really have got to show what you're doing because that isn't clear at all.

An arpeggio is all the note of a chord played separately, if you show how you play it now I can help you otherwise it's hard to do that.
Like arpeggios of yngwie malmsteen
 

Dakjones45

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Jul 18, 2020
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Am I the only one that finds these to be entirely unhelpful. We're given the pentatonic scale one time and then the dude just jams over it. It moves far too quickly and you can't play along at all. You just end up watching him without being at all familiar with the shape yet. This feels a far cry from a beginner lesson.
 
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Jak Angelescu

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Am I the only one that finds these to be entirely unhelpful. We're given the pentatonic scale one time and then the dude just jams over it. It moves far too quickly and you can't play along at all. You just end up watching him without being at all familiar with the shape yet. This feels a far cry from a beginner lesson.
Dak,
I'm sorry that you feel that way. There are some things are I'd be more than happy to help you with as many students do find it helpful but there are some students that didn't. The team is working on a method to help students grasp these concepts better. The CAGED system is one being talked about.
 
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Dominik Gräber

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Am I the only one that finds these to be entirely unhelpful. We're given the pentatonic scale one time and then the dude just jams over it. It moves far too quickly and you can't play along at all. You just end up watching him without being at all familiar with the shape yet. This feels a far cry from a beginner lesson.
I get what you are saying. I Had a Lot of Problems with this at First. But I think you Just have to approach it differently. If PG teaches you a chord or a scale learn it. Nobody wants you to be able to apply it on the Spot. Then PG Shows you whaz you CAN do with only the Material of the Lesson. That's a Goal you want to achieve, Not something you should already be able to do.
Hell, I've been through all CAGED Lessons and already wrote my own stuff and still can't improvise on the Spot Like PG.

At the end of the day These lessons are Not ment to binge watch and then you know a whole Bunch of stuff. You are supposed to Take your time, practice the basics and If you can play the scales and chords introduced and understood everything PG Said, then you can move on. Ideally With showing us what you've learned ;)

However If you DON'T understand what's explained in the Lessons don't hesitate to ask even the dumbest sounding questions in the Forum and you WILL get Help. It can be difficult to grasp for beginners, I know that First hand.

Hope that helped you a little :)

Edit: and If you want to Play along to it, every lesson also has a backing track to Jam over it!
 
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William Byerley

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Am I the only one that finds these to be entirely unhelpful. We're given the pentatonic scale one time and then the dude just jams over it. It moves far too quickly and you can't play along at all. You just end up watching him without being at all familiar with the shape yet. This feels a far cry from a beginner lesson.
these are videos, you can zoom in pause slow down all you want. pretty much with all lessons, there will be a lot to take in and the trick for me is to just keep going back and forth between lessons. If you know it's the minor pentatonic he's using and your not comfortable enough with it yet, you can look up the notes of the scale and practice it by itself than go back to the video. When I get stuck I leave it and try something I might be able to do at that moment.

they packed a lot of information into these lessons, not just the tabs but just the things they talk about as well
i hope this helps
 

Imactuallyadrummer

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Am I the only one that finds these to be entirely unhelpful. We're given the pentatonic scale one time and then the dude just jams over it. It moves far too quickly and you can't play along at all. You just end up watching him without being at all familiar with the shape yet. This feels a far cry from a beginner lesson.
I’m a beginner, like Dominik mentioned I don’t think the intention of the lesson is for you to be able to play the improv like that at full speed. But to slowly get familiar with the rest of the fretboard, how the chords are all linked together etc... Of course you always have the option to down speed it and try it out (no shame I sometimes play at 40% LOL)

And yeah his jams show you the potential of the material being used, to me it proves that it’s not theory for the sake of learning theory. But as a beginner I’m not gonna expect to improv like that. I think just “understand” the theory behind it and move on for now. But I always revisit these set of lessons cause it makes more sense every time I come back and look at it. To be honest now I skip back and forth between beginner and intermediate material, the intermediate material teaches more physical co-ordination stuff. This keeps it fresh for me

truth is IMO that you probably wouldn’t even need those lessons if all you wanted to do was read tabs and jam songs, but I think many people are here to break that cycle and actually learn more about their instrument and the fretboard.
 
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