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CAGED System – The C Shape – Lesson 24

Lesson by: SynGates.com

hypertensao

New Student
Jul 11, 2020
7
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Portugak
Am I the only one that finds these to be entirely unhelpful. We're given the pentatonic scale one time and then the dude just jams over it. It moves far too quickly and you can't play along at all. You just end up watching him without being at all familiar with the shape yet. This feels a far cry from a beginner lesson.
I feel you bro.
First time i looked into the video, guitar in hand and then PapaGates just starts blitzing over the fretboard and improvising.
I am very sure that this lesson (and very likely this whole module) is supposed to be more theoretical. If you look at other places, you will see that CAGED system is BIG (even if you don't fully understand the concept as I do). Maybe the purpose is to really get to know one of the major chords in Rock music...
So, just take it slow. If you feel frustrated, just avoid it for a couple of days and practice cord changes or learn a new riff/song.

For this lesson I am doing the following as practice:
-Play the arpeggio/chord/double stops
-Play the scale
-Play the pentatonic
-Mix scales and chords at random to see how they sound
-Slow down the video to 50/75% and play over his tracks
-I watched the video from Jak Angelescu on the first page and it also helps out

Suggestion:
It would be amazing if we could have some exercises at the end of each lesson, either as a separate video, or an exercise sheet. I have been basically copying what PapaGates is doing on the videos (but i have really bad imagination:) )
 

Ids Schiere

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I feel you bro.
First time i looked into the video, guitar in hand and then PapaGates just starts blitzing over the fretboard and improvising.
I am very sure that this lesson (and very likely this whole module) is supposed to be more theoretical. If you look at other places, you will see that CAGED system is BIG (even if you don't fully understand the concept as I do). Maybe the purpose is to really get to know one of the major chords in Rock music...
So, just take it slow. If you feel frustrated, just avoid it for a couple of days and practice cord changes or learn a new riff/song.

For this lesson I am doing the following as practice:
-Play the arpeggio/chord/double stops
-Play the scale
-Play the pentatonic
-Mix scales and chords at random to see how they sound
-Slow down the video to 50/75% and play over his tracks
-I watched the video from Jak Angelescu on the first page and it also helps out

Suggestion:
It would be amazing if we could have some exercises at the end of each lesson, either as a separate video, or an exercise sheet. I have been basically copying what PapaGates is doing on the videos (but i have really bad imagination:) )
What kind of exercises are you looking for? Just some utilizing the c shape or also the use of it?
 

Imactuallyadrummer

New Student
Legend
May 27, 2020
34
64
Toronto, Ontario
0
I feel you bro.
First time i looked into the video, guitar in hand and then PapaGates just starts blitzing over the fretboard and improvising.
I am very sure that this lesson (and very likely this whole module) is supposed to be more theoretical. If you look at other places, you will see that CAGED system is BIG (even if you don't fully understand the concept as I do). Maybe the purpose is to really get to know one of the major chords in Rock music...
So, just take it slow. If you feel frustrated, just avoid it for a couple of days and practice cord changes or learn a new riff/song.

For this lesson I am doing the following as practice:
-Play the arpeggio/chord/double stops
-Play the scale
-Play the pentatonic
-Mix scales and chords at random to see how they sound
-Slow down the video to 50/75% and play over his tracks
-I watched the video from Jak Angelescu on the first page and it also helps out

Suggestion:
It would be amazing if we could have some exercises at the end of each lesson, either as a separate video, or an exercise sheet. I have been basically copying what PapaGates is doing on the videos (but i have really bad imagination:) )
I think you don’t have to worry so much about the PG improv. I feel like he is just trying to show you the potential of what you can do if you play over the scales. By playing over his improvs you are likely building up more manual dexterity more than anything.

get thru the rest of the exercises, then quickly watch them again. Then watch the stuff at the beginning again. It sounds tedious but the lessons aren’t that long, and I promise for some reason every time you look back,something new will click.

instead of playing the exercises I think it will help to ask yourself some questions about the concepts of the lesson as I feel these series are more theory heavy than playing heavy.

for example...do you know why he specifically adds those “extra” notes into the arpeggios? or how he came up with the pentatonic scale off the arpeggio?

for actual exercises I think just practicing the “CAGED” positions all over the neck for all bites is the best practice you can get for now.
 
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Brian Haner Sr.

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Staff member
Nov 11, 2019
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Exactly. Don't dwell on what I'm playing. I'm just showing some possibilities - and how I approach it. Once you understand the concept; chord shapes, arpeggios and pent scale - then it's your job to come up with your own things to play. Fool around with it. It's all a big game of "what if". What if I play this? What if I play that? Some things will suck and some things won't. Record EVERYTHING because you never know when you're going to play something cool. Then go back and learn the cool stuff. Put it in your tool box. Build a catalogue of licks that work over the C shape. Then do the same for the A shape.
This stuff is hard. It's supposed to be. Dig in!
 

Imactuallyadrummer

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May 27, 2020
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If I may add, I thought many of the examples given are very good exercises. They are all pretty short, but it's a recording and you can highlight the parts you want to practice eg. the double stops, slow them down. Take the part you just learned and you can play i over the backing track located next to the speed settings. I recommend leaving the metronome always on clicking. ( you don't always have to pay attention to it )
There's a lot of information in these videos, I'm sure they tried really hard to keep it as short as possible and trying not to leave things out. Plus it's in an order they think would boost your playing the fastest. Oh and correctly.
they are good exercises, but I think without understanding its roots, the exercises will feel a little empty and would be no different than just playing a song in one particular position. By looking at the associated major scale and how the chords are derived from it I feel the lessons will have a lot more substance to it
 

Ids Schiere

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@Imactuallyadrummer I don't know, when I think root it's lowest bottom? Maybe it's easy to make power chords and than just hit it, let it ring than hit 4 of those notes and than change chord? sry i can't focus right now
Root basically implies the root of the chord you're playing. So for example if you have an E you have E G# B. So you have a root that's E, said E doesn't always have to be the lowest note in the chord. Inversions are still the same chord, it's about the intervals that are present in the chord(1 3 5). You also have inverted power chords for example and they sound killer.
 

Ids Schiere

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they are good exercises, but I think without understanding its roots, the exercises will feel a little empty and would be no different than just playing a song in one particular position. By looking at the associated major scale and how the chords are derived from it I feel the lessons will have a lot more substance to it
Could you clarify/specify which info you're missing? I can probably help with that
 

Imactuallyadrummer

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Could you clarify/specify which info you're missing? I can probably help with that
LOL! What a confusing post hahaha. I meant to say something like - If you don’t understand the background how and why the chords are formed (1, 3, 5) then the lesson feels like it’s a little too much and doesn’t make much sense. I didn’t even mean to imply root note 😧
 

Ids Schiere

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If he didn't say the Major chord was made up of 1,3,5, I would have never known it was 1,3,5. I'm still kind of stuck on why and how do I figure out a Minor chord without someone telling me? Sorry if I'm confusing you guys, I'm confused a bit myself. I've just been kind of going by ear and patterns.
Does the 1,3,5, thing apply to playing chords as well? I've seen people talk about "ok, now lets do the 1,3,5 progression" or something like that. Would the 1,3,5 be the chords C,G,D? using CAGED as the 1=C 2=A and so on
For minor chords you flatten the third. So for E minor you get E G B instead of E G# B.

What's meant with a 1-3-5 chord progression is a I-iii-V chord progression they imply the degree of the key your in. For example if you take the E major chord family in the key of E major you have a I chord which is The E, a iii chord which is a G# minor and a V chord which is B.

CAGED only refers to the chord shapes to make transitions possible, it doesn't tell anything about the harmony.
 

Imactuallyadrummer

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May 27, 2020
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If he didn't say the Major chord was made up of 1,3,5, I would have never known it was 1,3,5. I'm still kind of stuck on why and how do I figure out a Minor chord without someone telling me? Sorry if I'm confusing you guys, I'm confused a bit myself. I've just been kind of going by ear and patterns.
Does the 1,3,5, thing apply to playing chords as well? I've seen people talk about "ok, now lets do the 1,3,5 progression" or something like that. Would the 1,3,5 be the chords C,G,D? using CAGED as the 1=C 2=A and so on
he does talk about the composition of a major chord, as well as a major scale, very early on in the lesson in the fundamentals which is why I say it’s worth reviewing those lessons even later on because you’ll get something new out of them every time. I believe he does touch on minor chords later as well

The important thing I had to really wrap my head around as a beginner is, remember CAGED is just a reference to SHAPES. if you look at the lesson names they talk about C shape, A shape... etc. But they (the lessons) are all in the D major scale. caged system gives you a basic “formula” on how to play the D major chord all over the neck in these lessons

man if I don’t know what I’m talking about someone please straighten me up, I’m relatively new too but really trying to understand sotheory alongside playing 😂
 

Ids Schiere

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your right, I was thinking maybe how would someone learn music through only reading and looking at diagrams, and not through umm hearing asstinance
Maybe a starting point for me is, learning the "intervals" (probably wrong word) in the basic scales? like half step whole step half step? Than also practice memorizing the names of each note on the board to find the roots? If I stay on one topic too long I get lost
Only through reading is done by knowing the fretboard really well. I sometimes read tabbooks as if they are an actual book and hear the notes in my head.

And yes you should start with intervals and the major scale, they are the basis of music theory.
 

Imactuallyadrummer

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your right, I was thinking maybe how would someone learn music through only reading and looking at diagrams, and not through umm hearing asstinance
Maybe a starting point for me is, learning the "intervals" (probably wrong word) in the basic scales? like half step whole step half step? Than also practice memorizing the names of each note on the board to find the roots? If I stay on one topic too long I get lost
I can’t tell ya how to start cause I’m still in that learning phase myself. Also luckily I already know the basis of the major scale from my drumming days and sitting through everyone else learning it lol But it is a really good start - the major scale and what you can derive from it. Really the fact that I had to learn about the major scale as a drummer probably speaks about its importance about it being the fundamentals.
As for memorizing the fretboard is something I accept that is going to take a long time if ever... there are some “landmarks” that help me but for now I accept that I’m just going to be counting frets 😂
 
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AccessionUntoVoid

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Aug 10, 2020
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Even though I've been playing the guitar for about 5 years. It was only today that I learnt about the CAGED system. I took classes from a tutor in the beginning but his method of teaching was different I guess....
Anyways I am so glad I found this website with such a great quality of lessons. I love syn so so much for it and I am sure I'll become a great artist one day.
 

Simon Austin

New Student
Nov 11, 2019
1
5
I get what you are saying. I Had a Lot of Problems with this at First. But I think you Just have to approach it differently. If PG teaches you a chord or a scale learn it. Nobody wants you to be able to apply it on the Spot. Then PG Shows you whaz you CAN do with only the Material of the Lesson. That's a Goal you want to achieve, Not something you should already be able to do.
Hell, I've been through all CAGED Lessons and already wrote my own stuff and still can't improvise on the Spot Like PG.

At the end of the day These lessons are Not ment to binge watch and then you know a whole Bunch of stuff. You are supposed to Take your time, practice the basics and If you can play the scales and chords introduced and understood everything PG Said, then you can move on. Ideally With showing us what you've learned ;)

However If you DON'T understand what's explained in the Lessons don't hesitate to ask even the dumbest sounding questions in the Forum and you WILL get Help. It can be difficult to grasp for beginners, I know that First hand.

Hope that helped you a little :)

Edit: and If you want to Play along to it, every lesson also has a backing track to Jam over it!
Thanks, this was very helpful. I was wondering when I should consider moving on. I have years of experience but I'm coming back into guitar after a break. I get the concepts quickly and can play the scales easily when I have either a scale reference or sheet music but I don't have both the Pentatonic and Major scales fully memorized yet for C. I think I'll move on to A and then continue to memorize all 4. Chords are a little awkward, but they don't really give me much trouble (other than that I'm a little slow to form them).
 

William Byerley

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Nov 11, 2019
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@Simon Austin I'm not finished with all the CAGED yet myself, but there is a lot of information in these videos. Each lesson builds on the next and goes over the ones before a little as well. Everyone learns differently and I don't think these lessons are suppose to be one listen and done. If you put them on repeat it's like PG or SG is sitting with you. ( :D ) I first heard about this system like 12 years ago and I only learned to make the shapes. Very hard at first, Stretches, the Barre Chords. I memorized them and left it till recently. ( it's just the basic chords + barring your index. ) right now I'm like halfway through the 2 lessons of the CAGED lesson 2 or 3 atm and it's like a review of what was covered in the lessons before. Cheers!