CHORDS THEORY - Lesson 22 - Compound intervals

Andrei Moraru

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Nov 11, 2019
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So do you like to charge your tutorials for months on end like energy attacks?
  1. Topics of discussion
  2. Compound intervals explained
1. Topics of discussion

In this tutorial, we will be looking at the concept of compound intervals. So, let's have some fun.

2. Compound intervals explained

In a previous tutorial, we discussed what musical intervals are. As a reminder, a musical interval is the difference in pitch between two notes. And in said tutorial, I also stated that we will be discussing simple music intervals, which are intervals between two notes located in the same octave.

Compound intervals, on the other hand, are intervals between two notes located in different octaves. The two octaves are consecutive ones of course. As you're about to see, compound intervals are obtained by compounding two intervals together: an octave and another interval from second to ... well, another octave. The many different compound intervals are the following:
  • ninth (9th) - can be major or minor and is obtained by compounding an octave and a second
  • tenth (10th) - can be major or minor and is obtained by compounding an octave and a third
  • eleventh (11th) - is a perfect interval and is obtained by compounding an octave and a fourth
  • twelfth (12th) - is a perfect interval and is obtained by compounding an octave and a fifth
  • thirteenth (13th) - can be major or minor and is obtained by compounding an octave and a sixth
  • fourteenth (14th) - can be major or minor and is obtained by compounding an octave and a seventh
  • fifteenth (15th) - is a perfect interval and is obtained by compounding an octave and another octave
Let's take a look at some examples now. I'm going to start with a regular octave and slowly build-up to the fifteenth interval. Let's take a look at these examples:

compound.jpg

And here they are played back.

As you can see, for a ninth, we have an octave between the low and high C notes and another second between the high C and D notes. For a tenth, we have an octave between the low and high C notes and a third between the high C and E notes and so on.

So where do these intervals come into play? Well, starting with the next tutorials we will be discussing advanced chords that are obtained by using these intervals. Before that though, a brief intermission of talking about 6th chords. See you next time.
 
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