CHORDS THEORY - Lesson 24 - Add9 chords

Andrei Moraru

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Nov 11, 2019
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So these chords have like a different shading added to them or what?
  1. Topics of discussion
  2. Added tone chords
  3. Major add9 chords
  4. Minor add9 chords
1. Topics of discussion

In this tutorial, we will be looking at the many different types of added tone chords. So, let's have some fun.

2. Added tone chords

Added tone chords are chords obtained by playing one of the basic triads with a note added on top of it. Wait, have we heard this before? The answer, of course, is yes, since it's basically the same technique used to play 7th and 6th chords. In the following, we will focus on chords that are notated with addNUMBER, where the number signifies what note we will add.

The added tone chords which we will talk about making use of compound intervals, mostly because we will be adding the 9th, 11th and 13th notes on top of triads. The resulting chords therefore are:

  • add9 chords - obtained by playing a triad on top of which we add the 9th note of the major scale (which is basically the second note, but an octave higher); the formula for them is 1 3 5 9
  • add11 chords - obtained by playing a triad on top of which we add the 11th note of the major scale (which is basically the fourth note, but an octave higher); the formula for them is 1 3 5 11
  • add13 chords - obtained by playing a triad on top of which we add the 13th note of the major scale (which is basically the sixth note, but an octave higher); the formula for them is 1 3 5 13
One thing you may notice when playing these chords is that each of them has a similar vibe to another type of chord we've already learned. Add9 chords have a similar vibe to sus2 chords, add11 chords have a similar vibe to sus4 chords and add13 chords have a similar vibe to 6th chords. Add13 and 6th chords actually use the same shapes.

This, of course, is due to the note that is added to each of these added tone chords, which is the same for their corresponding chord, except an octave higher.

Unlike previous tutorials, we will only be discussing two chord qualities for each of these chord types. In short, we will be looking only at major and minor added tone chords. The reason is due to the fact that if we augment or diminish the main triad, we will get a chord that has a completely different name and feel. For example, a Caugadd9 chord is usually referred to as E7/C, because we have the E, G# and D notes, which are used to form an E7 chord and which also give us the main feel of the chord.

In this thread, we will focus only on add9 chords since they're a tad more common. In the next lesson, we will discuss add11 and add13 chords.

3. Major add9 chords

Let's take a look at major add9 chords. First off, Cadd9, C form:

Cadd9_Cform.png
And here it is played back.

Next up, the A form:

Cadd9_Aform.png
And here it is played back.

Let's move on to the G form:

Cadd9_Gform.png
And here it is played back.

Next up, the E form:

Cadd9_Eform.png
And here it is played back.

Finally, the D form:

Cadd9_Dform.png
And here it is played back.

4. Minor add9 chords

Let's move on to minor add9 chords. We're gonna play the Cmadd9 chord using the CAGED system. First off, the C form:

Cmadd9_Cform.png
And here it is played back.

Let's move on to the A form:

Cmadd9_Aform.png
And here it is played back.

Next in line is the G form:

Cmadd9_Gform.png

And here it is played back.

Let's look at the E form now:

Cmadd9_Eform.png
And here it is played back.

Finally, the D form:

Cmadd9_Dform.png
And here it is played back.

That about covers it for this one. Next time, we continue our added tone chords journey by talking about add11 and add13 chords. See you then.
 
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