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Daws

Ids Schiere

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Legend
Nov 11, 2019
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I'm watching the latest episode of drinks with Johnny at the moment and Jake mentions he's getting into EDM.

Later on he says he has used pro tools since forever but for the EDM stuff he learned Ableton.

Personally, I use studio one and I find my way around it fairly comfortable (at least the basics). I also do a drum programming masterclass or did up until volume 2 of the thing. This drum masterclass is taught in ableton and there is nothing he did I couldn't do in studio one. At the same time I remember @Radu-Cristian Perde saying in the music production class that each EDM can do roughly the same thing and it's just preference.

However, Jake pitts learning Ableton just for EDM even though he has been using pro tools since forever makes me wonder, are some daws more suitable for one music genre compared to others?
 

Radu-Cristian Perde

Hot Topic Tourer
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Nov 11, 2019
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Montreal
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I'm watching the latest episode of drinks with Johnny at the moment and Jake mentions he's getting into EDM.

Later on he says he has used pro tools since forever but for the EDM stuff he learned Ableton.

Personally, I use studio one and I find my way around it fairly comfortable (at least the basics). I also do a drum programming masterclass or did up until volume 2 of the thing. This drum masterclass is taught in ableton and there is nothing he did I couldn't do in studio one. At the same time I remember @Radu-Cristian Perde saying in the music production class that each EDM can do roughly the same thing and it's just preference.

However, Jake pitts learning Ableton just for EDM even though he has been using pro tools since forever makes me wonder, are some daws more suitable for one music genre compared to others?
Overall, all DAWs will be able to do the same thing. But it's also true that DAWs are designed to favor certain genre or style over others and make the process easier (as I mention, its a question of different workflows). In other words, each will have the same tools but the way they will optimize the use of those tools, depending on the task you wanna accomplish, will differ from DAW to DAW which is why DAWs like Ableton and FL studio are used a lot in the electronic world: they have tools that favor this style of production.
 

Ids Schiere

Sold-out Crowd Surfer
Legend
Nov 11, 2019
5,158
6,121
Groningen
11
Overall, all DAWs will be able to do the same thing. But it's also true that DAWs are designed to favor certain genre or style over others and make the process easier (as I mention, its a question of different workflows). In other words, each will have the same tools but the way they will optimize the use of those tools, depending on the task you wanna accomplish, will differ from DAW to DAW which is why DAWs like Ableton and FL studio are used a lot in the electronic world: they have tools that favor this style of production.
Aah, good too know. Got a little bit curious so figured I'd ask😅
 
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Brian Haner Sr.

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Nov 11, 2019
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Pro Tools has been the industry standard for many years, but over the last couple of years I've definitely seen a changing of the guard. While Pro Tools is still the predominant favorite, I've seen a ton of younger people moving to Logic Pro and Ableton. I did some recording for a couple of rappers a couple years back (creating loops) and they worked exclusively on Ableton - which is great for creating beats and working with electronic sounds.
And since Yamaha bought Cubase, that's even making a comeback. It's actually an amazing DAW that's super intuitive and user-friendly.
At Musicians Institute in L.A., they give you a choice of DAWs to learn.
Times are definitely changing.