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Advanced Dominant seventh chords

Advanced Theory

Ids Schiere

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I was messing around with tritone substitutions and such and while doing this I stumbled across a little epiphany about dominant seventh chords.

Basically, If you take out the root in a diminished chord you are left with a diminished triad. Let's take B7 for example, you are left with D# F# and A which would be a full diminished chord without the C. If you move all of those notes down three semitones you get C D# and F# which is basically a G#7 without the root. If you move those down nother three steps you get A C D# which is the F7 without the root. If you than move those back down three steps you get F# A C which is D7 without the root and lastly if you move that back down three steps you are back at D# F# A which is the B7 without the root. Could you say that besides the tritone sub you also can speak of the minor third sub?

And even further could you say that there are only 3 dominant seventh chords just like there are only three diminshed chords really?
 
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Autumn

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  • Nov 11, 2019
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    Could you posbily elaborate on how there are only really three diminished chords? I just tried the dropping the root to get a dominant 7th thing and mind=blown :explode-skull:
     
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    Ids Schiere

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    Could you posbily elaborate on how there are only really three diminished chords? I just tried the dropping the root to get a dominant 7th thing and mind=blown :explode-skull:
    Basically, a diminished chord is 4 stacked minor thirds. So if you take for example E diminished it's E G Bb C# if you then take G diminished it's G Bb C# E which is just the same notes with a different root. Basically it's a symmetric chord, if you take E diminished, F diminished and F# diminished you already have all the possible note combinations for diminished chords so there are just three really.