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FRETBOARD Memorization/Visualisation

Christian Schulze

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Whaddup Synner FAM!

As many of you know I do a series on this site called CJ's 2 Cents on the lessons of this wonderful site. And I also did one on the topic of memorizing the freboard:


In the video I used a clip of Uncle Ben/Ben Eller to explain the concept of Chunking....well Uncle Ben did it again!

Here is a video of him explaining an amazing trick to fretboard memorization that I just fell in love with!


Try the trick out! Every note IS EVERYWHERE!

Cheers!
 

Christian Schulze

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He's my favorite YT teacher for guitar, he told me why I sucked at guitar and said he was my uncle. This is nice, I've been taking in all this theory, I need to practice more specifics. This is how a7x writes the nice guitar duals?
P.S. I only saw like 2-3 videos from him cause I haven't been learning for a awhile and found him only just like 3 years ago.
He is amazing! Watch more of his stuff!
 

Jak Angelescu

Guitarist for Unknown🎸 Mother of Dragons🐉
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    that's awesome you found another great video! I however know that depending on what style you play or how you want to play, the CAGED system is very beneficial. So I wouldn't toss it completely. That's my 2 cents😉😉
     
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    Chris Johnston

    Music Theory Bragger
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    Great video! I tend to try and think in the simplest way possible to memorize the fretboard as my memory is atrocious :LOL:

    The way I think of it is surrounding the 'natural notes' - no sharps or flats: I just remember that BC & EF are always stuck together and everything else has a sharpened or flattened version of the note separating it. Every string is just this process happening from a different note. Take the Low E string for example:

    The open note is E, so 1st fret must be F (as they're stuck together) next fret would be F# (one fret up from F - also one fret below G - so you could call it Gb too!) Then you repeat the same process until you reach B, which is stuck to C on the next fret, eventually you'll end up on 12th fret E an octave above.

    The trick is to practice going to all of the 'natural notes' on each string (no sharps or flats), and visualize the shape that you build between the 1 fret gaps and your BC & EF's - This will give you solid placeholders on every string for your natural notes so that if you want to find an A# for example, you only need to see she shape & go one fret above A.

    I use this method because you technically only have to memorize a shape on a string, and remember the string name starting it all.

    Cheesy rhyme to remember: B&C, E&F, other notes have a 1 fret stretch 🤟
     
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    Christian Schulze

    Hot Topic Tourer
    Legend
    Nov 11, 2019
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    Spain
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    Great video! I tend to try and think in the simplest way possible to memorize the fretboard as my memory is atrocious :LOL:

    The way I think of it is surrounding the 'natural notes' - no sharps or flats: I just remember that BC & EF are always stuck together and everything else has a sharpened or flattened version of the note separating it. Every string is just this process happening from a different note. Take the Low E string for example:

    The open note is E, so 1st fret must be F (as they're stuck together) next fret would be F# (one fret up from F - also one fret below G - so you could call it Gb too!) Then you repeat the same process until you reach B, which is stuck to C on the next fret, eventually you'll end up on 12th fret E an octave above.

    The trick is to practice going to all of the 'natural notes' on each string (no sharps or flats), and visualize the shape that you build between the 1 fret gaps and your BC & EF's - This will give you solid placeholders on every string for your natural notes so that if you want to find an A# for example, you only need to see she shape & go one fret above A.

    I use this method because you technically only have to memorize a shape on a string, and remember the string name starting it all.

    Cheesy rhyme to remember: B&C, E&F, other notes have a 1 fret stretch 🤟
    Yess kinda like the chunkint method I explained in my 2 cents video!
     
    • Love
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