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Introduction to the 12 Bar Blues – Lesson 68

Lesson by: SynGates.com

Josh Ellis

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    For anybody new to learning chords, the section in which he plays through the "9ths" versions, the last A9 is a typo of a sort. First of all, the first A9 should have been written as "A9/C#" because the chord has the major third of A as the root note and not the "A" or "1". Should be fixed to keep from confusing newer theory learners but after a few moments, I finally understood HOW it was an A9. Also, the last "A9", if it's correctly drawn on the clefs, then it should be written as "Am9/C" or renamed to "Cmaj7". That stumped me for longer trying to understand HOW in the world it was still an A9 having a minor 3rd in the notation. Just a heads up for anybody else rolling through who wants to stop the video player and understand the chords🤪
     

    Radu-Cristian Perde

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    Ok so im having a bit of hard time with this lesson. I guess I get it that the point of it is to explain the phrasing of blues music but now I have follow up questions. So what makes it that this is blues except the 12 bar phrasing. Is it the chord progression used? The chords in themselves as I see that they become reeeeeally tricky? Or is it the strumming pattern? I mean, if you ask me, I do hear it that its the blues but from a theory aspect, I am curious to know what specifically makes it so.
     

    Ed Seith

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    There are others more theory-versed than myself, but I believe that what makes it the 12-bar blues is the 12-bar phrasing and all of the chord changes in the I-IV-V way.

    12-bar blues in E will be E-A-E-A-B-A-E.
    In G, it would be the same pattern of changes, but replacing E-A-B with G-C-D.

    Make sense?
     
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    Radu-Cristian Perde

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    There are others more theory-versed than myself, but I believe that what makes it the 12-bar blues is the 12-bar phrasing and all of the chord changes in the I-IV-V way.

    12-bar blues in E will be E-A-E-A-B-A-E.
    In G, it would be the same pattern of changes, but replacing E-A-B with G-C-D.

    Make sense?
    It actually does I think!

    So if I were to rephrase what you say,in this exemple, what would make this blues is how the chord are played in a 12 bar space by using the First, fourth and fifth chord of given key chord family!

    Correct?
     
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    Radu-Cristian Perde

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    Another big part about the blues is taking a I-IV-V (G-C-D) and playing the (G) Minor Pentatonic over those major chords!
    See, here is another thing that confuses me. Pentatonics are essentially shapes right? By themselves they arent Major or minor but its mostly by context. So when you mean a g minor pentatonic, do you mean a pentatonic that starts with its relative minor!?
     

    Chris Johnston

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    See, here is another thing that confuses me. Pentatonics are essentially shapes right? By themselves they arent Major or minor but its mostly by context. So when you mean a g minor pentatonic, do you mean a pentatonic that starts with its relative minor!?

    Pentatonics are derived from the Major Scale (Or Natural Minor Scale - depending on how you view it) They can be both Major and Minor depending on the underlying harmony. If someone means G minor pentatonic, they could mean the G natural minor scale without the 2nd and the 6th. The G minor pentatonic is also the Bb Major Pentatonic because they share the exact same notes. You can also use pentatonics for Modal sounds like Dorian & Lydian. They're really useful scales to know!
     
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    Chris Johnston

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    Pentatonics are derived from the Major Scale (Or Natural Minor Scale - depending on how you view it) They can be both Major and Minor depending on the underlying harmony. If someone means G minor pentatonic, they could mean the G natural minor scale without the 2nd and the 6th. The G minor pentatonic is also the Bb Major Pentatonic because they share the exact same notes. You can also use pentatonics for Modal sounds like Dorian & Lydian. They're really useful scales to know!

    A useful Lydian hack is to play the Minor Pentatonic 1 fret behind the home chord. So if you're in G lydian, try F# minor pentatonic :geek:
     

    Radu-Cristian Perde

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    Pentatonics are derived from the Major Scale (Or Natural Minor Scale - depending on how you view it) They can be both Major and Minor depending on the underlying harmony. If someone means G minor pentatonic, they could mean the G natural minor scale without the 2nd and the 6th. The G minor pentatonic is also the Bb Major Pentatonic because they share the exact same notes. You can also use pentatonics for Modal sounds like Dorian & Lydian. They're really useful scales to know!
    Aaaaah that makes sense and it consolidates what I thought that its about context. That one scale could be Major or minor depending on where the tonal center is! Like you said, the G minor pentatonic has the same notes as the Bb Major pentatonic.
     
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    Ids Schiere

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    Ok so im having a bit of hard time with this lesson. I guess I get it that the point of it is to explain the phrasing of blues music but now I have follow up questions. So what makes it that this is blues except the 12 bar phrasing. Is it the chord progression used? The chords in themselves as I see that they become reeeeeally tricky? Or is it the strumming pattern? I mean, if you ask me, I do hear it that its the blues but from a theory aspect, I am curious to know what specifically makes it so.
    As far as theory talk goes. You have roman numerals which implies harmony. Common ones being I-V-vi-IV, ii-V-I, I-IV-V. That last one(I-IV-V) is a typical blues chord progression and is effectively what blues typically revolves around. In A for example you would get something involving A-D-E like the example here. If you than take Thrill is gone by B.B. King you get a I-IV-V in Bm, something like Olivia by John Mayer I-IV-V in G etc. Effectively all blues songs revolve around a I-IV-V chord progression of a variation on that
     
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