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Intermediate Practicing the modes of C major scale

Intermediate Theory

Brian Haner Sr.

Administrator
Staff member
Nov 11, 2019
615
2,166
Fun exercise, but it completely misses the point of modes. This is just a C scale starting on the 1st note , then the 2nd, then the 3rd, etc. It all just sounds like he's playing in C major.
Calling this "modes" is misleading.
If you are jamming in D Dorian - say Dm to G7, it sounds like you're playing in Dm. It never sounds like you're playing in C Major. D Dorian is: D E F G A B C. It HAPPENS to share the same notes as a C Major scale, but it is not a C Major scale. It is a minor scale: 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7.
It's a bit confusing, but an important distinction.
 

Ids Schiere

Sold-out Crowd Surfer
Legend
Nov 11, 2019
5,015
5,711
Groningen
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PG is right try doing some chord progressions taking each chord from the chord family as a I chord

For example in C

C-G7-Am-F
Dm-Am-Bm7b5-G7
Em-Bm7b5-C-Am
F-Bm7b5-Dm-C
G-Dm-Em-C
Am-Em-F-Dm
Bm7b5-Fmaj7-G7-Em7

The mode you're in is not defined by the notes you play in your scale, it's defined by the chords underneath it and you can make certain aspects shine a little more. For example, the b2 is what makes phrygian sound phrygian so it's nice to throw it in there otherwise you may as well be in aeolian but the mode you're in is defined by the chords underneath not the notes itself. This is great exercise to learn the fretboard but it really doesn't teach a lot in terms of understanding the modes.